Excellence In Fibers

Excellence In Fibers is on view until March 19, 2017 at New Bedford Art Museum/ArtWorks! Four weavings are on exhibit. Fiber Art Now, a quarterly print and digital magazine, developed the exhibition.

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Resist. 2016. Natural dye on cotton, handwoven.
P1070593
Game. 2016. Natural dye on cotton, handwoven.
game2
Game #2, 2017. Natural dye on cotton, handwoven.
rhythm_game_1
Rhythm Game #1. 2017. Natural dye on cotton and wool, handwoven.

 

They Gave Us Directions

Textile-Fragment-161
Indo-Egyptian Textile Framgent

Original image posted in Indian Printed Textiles, a catalogue of the collection by Ruth Barnes. The entire collection is available to view courtesy of  Eastern Art on-line at the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford.

http://www.jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/collection/7/10236/10407

Motif developed from a textile fragment with rosettes, arches, stylized trees or flowers, and leaves.

Date: 2nd half of the 13th century – 1st half of the 14th century

Material and technique: cotton, block-printed with resist, and dyed blue; with remains of stitching in flax

Original fragment size: 11 1/32” x 7 5/8”

Accession number: EA1990.161

Research on Indian Ikat influenced the development of studio ikat method

Ikat is a traditional form of yarn preparation for weaving that is practiced in many Asian and Central Asian countries as well as Central and South America and North Africa. Artisans bind selected sections of warp or weft threads before dyeing, in order to form patterns in the cloth as it is woven on the loom. “Warp ikat” describes the process of binding the warp in a patterned way to prevent selected areas from receiving dye prior to placing the warp on the loom to weave. Similarly “weft ikat” is woven from resist-bound dyed weft threads, and “double ikat” is woven from both warp and weft-bound dyed threads. In 2009, a Fulbright-Nehru senior research award enabled me to document warp resist binding in the village of Somasar, in the Surendranagar region of Gujarat, India. I adapted what I learned from Master Weaver Vaghela G. Vitthalbhai, for use in a western studio where imagery and pattern development ideas differ from traditional Indian patola (double ikat designs specific to Patan, Gujarat). The workshop I taught in Lodz, Poland was based on this research. We used plant based natural dye on cotton warp to develop our color.

Liliana Chwistek removes binding from her warp, dyed with Brazilwood.
Liliana Chwistek removes binding from her warp, dyed with Brazilwood.
Working as a team, Katarzyna Sojka weaves up the warp that Dominika Zientek designed the previous week. The looms she is weaving on was once in one of the many weavings mills that populated the city.
Working as a team, Katarzyna Sojka weaves up the warp that Dominika Zientek designed the previous week. The loom she is weaving on was once in one of the many weavings mills that populated the city.

PATA-Printmaking and Textile Art Workshops

A group of international students convened at the Strzemiński Academy of Fine Arts in Łódź, Poland to participate in “Resist!,” a two week intensive course on designing and dyeing cotton warps with red and yellow plant based dyes. Participants from Poland joined with other textile artists from England, Iceland, Ireland, and Spain. The academy is home to an extensive and well respected textile art, design and fashion program. Students wove on looms from historic mills that populated the city since the 19th century.Marlgorzata Chwedoruk

Marta-S

Marion-C

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Weaving ikat with natural dye! Summer 2014

Tree Homage
Tree Homage. 2013-14. Warp ikat; cotton; locally sourced natural dyes: madder root and cosmos. 59”x 24” (150 x 61 cm)

I have been waiting to weave up the warp that I dyed in the summer of 2013. Finally, I have the time to put it on the loom and weave it up. Dyes are from madder and cosmos flowers. The weave structure requires 16 shafts and I am using 3 colors in the weft.Loom-view-sm

ikat-in-progress

back of loom