Surface Design Association

Guest Editor 40th Anniversary Summer Issue

I was honored to be the guest editor of the summer issue and enjoyed developing content, working with the authors, staff, and editor Marci Rae McDade.

Your copy of the Summer Issue, Making our Mark: SDA at 40, is available with membership to the Surface Design Association, http://www.surfacedesign.org/

Angela Hennessy’s Untitled (floor mat) (detail) 2016, velcro dots, 42″ in diameter is featured on the front cover. Great articles and more excellent visuals inside.

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Excavated Pattern, Oregon College of Arts and Crafts

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At the Making our Mark conference in Portland, Oregon, August 3-6, 2017, I returned to a theme I have explored recently and installed 13 digitally cut vinyl patterns, my interpretation of Indian block-printed textiles found in Egypt. Ruth Barnes, as curator of the textile collection at Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, undertook the task of cataloguing well over 1,000 textile artifacts from the Newberry Collection dating from the 12th to the 16th century. This exceptional collection and scholarly document is the foundation for this artwork. The fragments on average are typically under 15” in length and width, yet reveal complex patterns, captured through digital tools to reintroduce them to conference attendees.IMG_1375

There’s Always an Apex Predator

Tugboat Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska’s most hip alternative space presented “There’s Always an Apex Predator” featuring new work by Jay Kreimer and Wendy Weiss, September 2-29, 2016.

“There’s Always an Apex Predator” explores crocodiles, prisoners of war, the holocaust and more though painted wood sculptures, digitally cut vinyl wall installations, prints and a sound score by Jay Kreimer and Adam Zahller. The work in this collaborative exhibition is entirely new and is drawn from experiences in India, personal and world history, and current political events.p1070795-sm

Kreimer’s father was a prisoner of war in World War ll. He was captured at the Battle of the Bulge. Kreimer states his father was “marched and marched, lined up at a pit to be shot, was not shot, and ended at Stalag lXB, Bad Orb, Germany.” Weiss adds this was “the worst German prison camp from which, in 1945, Jewish prisoners and perceived troublemakers were sent to the Berga concentration camp, a slave labor camp that mixed American POWs with Holocaust victims in a work to death frenzy.” Eldon Kreimer spoke little about his time in Stalag lXB, but he did tell a story about dividing a packet of raisins from a Red Cross package between his fellow prisoners. Starving, as they all were, he held back three extra raisins for himself and ate them. Later he felt compelled to confess this transgression to his group. Three raisins.p1070801-sm
Our interest in his experience paralleled what developed from a latent interest for me about the Holocaust and cruelties in Europe during World War ll. As a child, my father had been gripped with the significance Holocaust and the industrialized murder of European Jews. In 2014, unintentionally, we stayed on the site of the Łódź Ghetto in Poland, called the “Litzmannstadt Getto” because during the war the occupiers briefly renamed the city after a German general who invaded the city in WWI.

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Other forms of predation entered our thoughts. Animals and insects in the service of men to torment—dogs and fleas—for example.

p1070805We lived for much of the past few years in Vadodara, Gujarat, a city of two million with the distinction of harboring the largest population of wild crocodiles in a city of that size in the world. They conclude, “so the crocodiles came to this party: Apex Predators.”

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Thanks to Nebraska Innovation Studio, a makerspace/fab lab, on Nebraska Innovation Campus, where we use terrific equipment and workspace for the development of the vinyl portion and some of the wood working portions of the installation. Check it out! And much gratitude to Peggy and Nolan and the super helpers at Tugboat.

They Gave Us Directions

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Based on block printed tent hangings illustrated in Indian Block-Printed Textiles in Egypt: The Newberry Collection in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford Collection in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford; Ruth Barnes, 1997.

They Gave Us Directions

Lux Art Center, Lincoln, NE

First Friday Reception: Friday, May 6, 2016 from 5-8 p.m.
View through June 24

Bri Murphy, gallery director of the Lux Art Center, sent out the message I have pasted below:

May is another month with two exciting exhibition openings you won’t want to miss. Wendy Weiss and Jay Kreimer have returned to Nebraska to bring us a slice of life in India. As recipients of multiple Fulbright awards, both artists have spent much of the past few years living and working in India as long term residents. This show is their response, complete with photography, sculpture, textiles, and auditory elements. The title, They Gave Us Directions, speaks to the exploratory nature of their experience. “…we were in search of one thing, as we asked for directions, we found another thing.”

Jay Kreimer is a sound artist, inventor, video artist and educator. He has performed a range of music professionally since 1979. One of Kreimer’s instruments, Tallboy, was a finalist in the international Guthman Musical Instrument Invention Competition in 2011. His music has been released in the US, Portugal and Canada, and distributed and reviewed internationally. Wendy Weiss is an independent artist and weaver. She is professor emerita of textile design in the Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her work has been exhibited in solo and group shows in North America, Europe and Asia. She uses natural dyes she cultivates and collects locally. Their collaborative works have been shown in galleries and museums in New York, San Francisco, Vancouver, Beijing and many other cities.

From Weiss and Kreimer, we can expect much more than a traditional art gallery experience. This time, when you walk into the LUX, you will be engulfed in the cacophony of the bustling streets of India. This exhibition exemplifies the unique capacity of art to transport the viewer to another place and culture, to see humanity from a different perspective, and perhaps to find new understanding and meaning.