Come to Convergence 2016 in Milwaukee!

I am happy to announce I will be teaching at Convergence in Milwaukee this year, the first week of August 2016. Visit the Handweavers Guild of America webpage for complete details: http://www.weavespindye.org/convergence
3W-M004 Mashru Scarf: Ikat in Indian Style with Natural Dye;

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, August 1-3, 2016, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Wind, bind, dye, and weave a cotton Ikat scarf inspired by the dazzling Mashru fabrics of India. Students will experience the magic of Ikat weaving on their own loom in this intense workshop where they will bind the warp with a resistdesign and dye it with natural dye on the first two days and weave a scarf on the third.

A 4–8 shaft loom with reed sizes of 8, 10, 12 or 15 and a warping board will be required. Materials Fee: $35. Level: Intermediate.

U-R036 Navigating the Graphic Potential of Pro-Weave for Repeat Design;
Thursday, August 4, 2016, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

A dazzling array of software is available to handweavers. Pro-Weave is an unusual choice because it allows the weaver to draw as a key part of the design process. In fact, the graphic potential is so great that the user can easily generate charts for other textile projects. This workshop explores how to use the graphic tools for repeat design and more.

A laptop with the free demo version of Pro-Weave installed will be required. Materials Fee: $6. Level: All.

S-FP076 Ikat Centers of India: Gujarat, Telengana, Odisha
Friday Afternoon, August 5, 2016, 2:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Wendy Weiss Explore the exciting world of contemporary Indian Ikat and draw your original design. In 2015 Wendy Weiss visited each area as part of her Fulbright-Nehru senior scholar research project and will show fabric samples from each Ikat region. Learn about her work introducing digital design techniques to a small group of artisans in the Saurashtra region of Gujarat and her visit to the Patola House, home of the world’s only Ikat museum.

Materials Fee: $1.50. Level: All.

Fences, Trees and Looms: Following the Thread Weavings by Wendy Weiss and Photographs by Jay Kreimer

Patio Gallery

Jewish Community Center, Louisville, Kentucky

February 21-March 29, 2016

Opening reception, Sunday, Feb. 21, 2-4pm

 

This exhibition features recent naturally dyed ikat weavings by Wendy Weiss and accompanying photographs of ikat artisans at work in India and historic looms and factory buildings in Łodź, Poland by Jay Kreimer. The exhibition also highlights five silk weavings by artisans in a rural community in the Surendranagar District of Gujarat, where Weiss worked as a Fulbright Nehru senior research scholar from October 2014 to July 2015, training the weavers in digital design. Ikat is a method of dyeing warp and/or weft yarns, using binding of selected areas of the threads to resist dye the yarns in a patterned way, prior to placing them on the loom to weave. Ms. Weiss has been developing a method to create pattern in ikat using the traditional Gujarati system for preparing the warp yarn.

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“Resist” weaving in progress, natural dye (madder, weld, iron), warp ikat.

In August of 2014 she taught an ikat workshop at the Strzeminski Academy of Fine Arts Łodź, Poland which inspired a group of weavings about the “Litzmannstadt Getto,” in Łodź. One of these weavings will be exhibited at the 15th International Triennale of Textiles in Łodź in 2016.

Stitched Poetry, a collection of natural dyed stitched and bound resist garments

A team of designers in the Clothing and Textiles Department at the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda created a collection of shibori garments following a workshop introducing them to the techniques of stitched and bound resist. Remarkably, after a brief introduction to the possible ways of using basic techniques the designers created a collection they premiered at the CREATIONS 2015 fashion show, April 2015, in Vadodara, Gujarat, India. Wendy Weiss introduced the group to shibori and Ankita Patadiya provided the natural dye session in the department, using indigo, sappanwood and ferrous acetate dyes. Wendy was a guest faculty member from October 2014-July 2015 while working in Gujarat on a Fulbright-Nehru Senior Scholar Award. Dr. Anjali Karolia is chair of the department and guided the team in their garment designs while Wendy worked with them on the resist concepts.

Jenifer Homi models her original design. Stitched and bound resist.
Mrs. Jenifer Homi models her original design in stitched and bound resist, creating rings like an ancient tree.
Mrs. Amrita Doshi designed a sarong and scarf.
Mrs. Amrita Doshi designed a sarong and scarf to adorn the adventurous man.
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Flowing wood grain drapes around the figure by Ankita Patadiya.
Bound resist disks top this flowing wood grain cover up by Ankita Patadiya.
Bound resist disks top this flowing wood grain cover up by Ankita Patadiya.
Mrs. Sukriti Patel
Mrs. Sukriti Patel used stitched and bound resist to shape the figure in this draped garment.
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Mrs. Sukriti Patel’s garment flows and moves on the runway, revealing the stitched shapes.
Mrs. Rinku Agrawal plays with circles, squares, and triangles on this indigo wrap.
Mrs. Rinku Agrawal plays with circles, squares, and triangles on this indigo wrap.
Combining multiple forms of stitch resist, Dr. Reena Bhatia created a garment in shade of indigo blue that shift as the model turns.
Combining multiple forms of stitch resist, Dr. Reena Bhatia created a garment in shades of indigo blue that shift as the model turns.
Stitched circles float across the front of Dr. Reena Bhatia's garment in deep shades of indigo blue.
Stitched circles float across the front of Dr. Reena Bhatia’s garment in deep shades of indigo.
The back detail of Mrs. Jenifer Homi's suggests coral shifting in the sea.
The back detail of Mrs. Jenifer Homi’s suggests coral shifting in the sea.
Arpita Desai
Miss Arpita Desai created bands of woodgrain that fall across the body, while bound resist circles and stitched lines shift with the flow of the moving figure..